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November 30, 2016

Russian PAK FA to get newly-designed engine



The first ground-based ignition for the second stage of the engine for the Prospective Airborne Complex of Frontline Aviation (PAK FA T-50 aircraft) has been successfully conducted by United Engine Corporation (UEC), a part of Rostec state holding company.

The United Engine Corporation (UEC) has successfully conducted the first ground-based ignition of the second stage of the engine for the Prospective Airborne Complex of Frontline Aviation (PAK FA T-50 aircraft). The UEC is part of the Rostec state holding company.
Gas generators had to be prepared for the testing, along with the demonstrator engine.

What is the PAK FA flying with now?
The PAK FA is currently using a first stage engine, a modernized Al-41.
Pavel Bulat, avionics specialist and head of the Kupol Group of Companies, said the AI-41 is an updated version of the engines used for the Su-27, Su-30 and other models in that series.
“The engine for the T-50 was significantly upgraded from the original models, incorporating the latest control system, compressors, and so on. Nevertheless, it still falls short of the 5th generation model, and is very noticeable on radar screens,” said the expert.
The new second-stage engine is one of the most advanced in the world, said Bulat. It enables the T-50 to accelerate to supersonic speed, and maintain that velocity throughout the flight, without using afterburners.
“The speed will be as much as Mach 1.6 (about 1,200 mph), depending on the terrain over which the flight is taking place. The engine will also significantly improve the stealth properties of the PAK FA, thanks to the use of new composite materials,” said Bulat.
The designers expect to start testing the new engine on fighter jets in 2018, and for the motor to be fully integrated in 2020.
“In addition to the engine, the radar station also needs to be modified, and engineers need to remove the last deficiencies in the airframe concept, which, among all the aircraft flying today, is the most modern in the world,” said the analyst.
New fighter's weapons
30-mm cannon
The firing unit comprises of the 9-A1-4071K, one of the lightest cannon in its class, which is designed to destroy armoured vehicles or armoured enemy targets. During one flight, the pilot can shoot 150 rounds from the 30-mm cannon.The new weapon is a modified single-barrel GSh-301 aircraft cannon, used in Russian fighters and bombers.
Aircraft bombs
The future T-50 5th generation fighter will also carry high-explosive and volume-detonating bombs, Sergey Rusakov, General Director of the Techmash Group, stated on September 22.
Rusakov said they were considering high-explosive incendiary OFZAB-500 aviation bombs for the PAK FA, and volume-detonating ODAB-500PMV, currently being used in Russian operations in Syria. Engineers have already produced a set of warheads for future tests.

Operational principle and the use of bombs in Syria
According to the rearmament programme, Russian Armed Forces will receive a batch of 12 T-50 fighters before the end of this year. A new contract for the supply of 5th generation aircraft will be discussed with the Ministry of Defence at the end of 2016, after which the War Department will decide how many new aircraft are needed.
The newest Russian fighter aircraft was built as the main competitor to the F-22 Raptor. The American stealth fighter distinguished itself during the Iraq War.
“The T-50 will go into serial production much later than the Raptor. This allows us to take into consideration all the pros and cons of the existing aircraft when constructing our own fighter. A similar situation existed when we were working on the multi-purpose 4th generation Su-27 fighter. The prototype of that domestic aircraft came out much later than the American F-16, and took into account the shortcomings of its precursor. As a result, the domestic Sukhoi was able to beat the ‘American,’ in terms of combat characteristics,” Vadim Kozyulin, Professor at the Academy of Military Sciences, told RIR.
The expert noted that the T-50 would be able to use the full range of existing high-precision air-to-air missiles, as well as all precision-guided munitions. “As part of the ‘stealth’ concept, special missiles for the PAK FA are being developed, with a square cross section that will allow more warheads to be carried in hatches during combat missions,” Kozyulin added.
Operational principle and the use of bombs in Syria
According to the rearmament programme, Russian Armed Forces will receive a batch of 12 T-50 fighters before the end of this year. A new contract for the supply of 5th generation aircraft will be discussed with the Ministry of Defence at the end of 2016, after which the War Department will decide how many new aircraft are needed.
The newest Russian fighter aircraft was built as the main competitor to the F-22 Raptor. The American stealth fighter distinguished itself during the Iraq War.
“The T-50 will go into serial production much later than the Raptor. This allows us to take into consideration all the pros and cons of the existing aircraft when constructing our own fighter. A similar situation existed when we were working on the multi-purpose 4th generation Su-27 fighter. The prototype of that domestic aircraft came out much later than the American F-16, and took into account the shortcomings of its precursor. As a result, the domestic Sukhoi was able to beat the ‘American,’ in terms of combat characteristics,” Vadim Kozyulin, Professor at the Academy of Military Sciences, told RIR.
The expert noted that the T-50 would be able to use the full range of existing high-precision air-to-air missiles, as well as all precision-guided munitions. “As part of the ‘stealth’ concept, special missiles for the PAK FA are being developed, with a square cross section that will allow more warheads to be carried in hatches during combat missions,” Kozyulin added.

 rbth

Rafale's serviceability rate is 48.5% compared with Su-30 MKI's 60%


The serviceability rate of the Dassault Rafale fighter jet in service with the French Air Force is 48.5%, according to information given to a French lawmaker by the government.
The serviceability rate or the availability rate is the number of aircraft ready for missions at any given time. In the case of the French Air Force’s Rafale jets, nearly half of the fleet is on the ground undergoing repairs or maintenance, Jane’s reported on 24 November 2016.
According to the Janes report, the official record for France's Dassault Rafale fighter fleet in 2015 (93 aircraft in service with the air force) with a budgeted maintenance cost of EUR343.90 million ($364.56 million). This information was given to a lawmaker which Jane’s did not identify.
The figure presents an interesting proposition as Dassault, through the French government is reported to have promised in its deal with India that it will ensure that there is 75 percent serviceability, i.e 27 aircraft are operationally available at any given time of the 36 that India has orders. “There will be steep penalties if they don’t adhere to timelines,” unnamed sources were quoted as saying by the Hindu on 23 September this year. India concluded an Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA) with France for the purchase of 36 Rafale fighter jets at a cost of €7.87 billion on the same day.
In contrast the Su-30MKI fleet with the Indian Air Force has an operational availability between 55-60 percent which gives it a higher serviceability than the Rafale jets in service with the French AF.

 The Indian MoD has been in negotiations with the Russian manufacturer of the Su-30 jet to raise the serviceability to 70-75 per cent.
Dassault will begin aircraft deliveries after 36 months and complete in 67 months.
The deliveries of Dassault Rafale fighter jets India ordered will commence from September 2019 with the French government and Dassault committed to providing depot-level maintenance during the pendency of the contract to ensure a high serviceability rate.

defenceworld


IAF's upgraded Jaguar DARIN III aircraft gets operation clearance


In a significant milestone for the country's military aviation sector, the upgraded Jaguar DARIN III twin-seat aircraft has received Initial Operation Clearance (IOC).

Deputy Chief of IAF, Air Marshal R K S Bhadauria, who flew the aircraft at HAL airport here recently, announced the satisfactory completion of IOC.

Test Pilot of Aircraft & Systems Testing Establishment, Wg Cdr V Prabhakaran was his co-pilot.

HAL CMD, T Suvarna Raju said the aircraft is now equipped with world class avionics system.

Congratulating those involved in achieving the milestone, Air Marshal Bhadauria said the DARIN III Upgrade was one of best upgrades in terms of data handling and overall capabilities.

The total design and development covering system requirement capture, specification preparation, software, hardware, electrical and mechanical design and development were carried out indigenously at HAL's Mission and Combat System Research and Design Centre (MCSRDC) and aircraft modification was done at Overhaul Division, added Raju.

Director (Engg and R & D),D K Venkatesh, ASTE Commandant Air Vice Marshal Sandeep Singh, and other senior executives witnessed the flight.

Besides HAL, certification agencies, trial team of ASTE and other agencies were involved in the upgrade programme.

Three DARIN I Standard Jaguars have been upgraded to DARIN III Standard by HAL.

The upgrade incorporates new state-of-the-art avionics architecture including the Open System Architecture Mission Computer (OSAMC), Fire Control Radar, Solid State Digital Video Recording System (SSDVRS), Autopilot with Alt Select & HNAV and Identification of Friend or Foe (IFF) and more.

pti ,brahmand

November 29, 2016

India Could Develop Combat Drone Engine With Help From Safran


Safran has offered to partner India’s Defense Research and Development Organization (DRDO) in the development of a variant of the indigenous Kaveri engine for its combat drone, ‘Ghatak’.
The French company which manufactures engines for Rafale fighter jets are waiting for an approval by the Union government.
“We are working on technologies required for ‘Ghatak’ with about Rs 230 crore ($33.5 million) sanctioned as part of pre-project studies,” S. Christopher, Director General, DRDO, and Secretary, Department of Defence R&D, Ministry of Defence (MoD) was quoted as saying by Deccan Chronicle Sunday.
Safran’s offer could help accelerate the development of Kaveri engine to power ‘Tejas’ (Light Combat Aircraft) fighter jets. So far, an expenditure of about Rs 2,100 crores ($306 million) was incurred on Kaveri engine by Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Bengaluru, over last three decades. In case the government approves collaboration with Safran, the French engine maker would contribute about Rs 500 crore to Rs 600 crore ($73 million to $87 million) and ensure certification of engines within the next 18 months for ‘Ghatak,’ ‘Tejas’ and Advanced Medium Combat Aircraft (AMCA), Christopher added.

defenceworld

November 24, 2016

India signs $1.4bn contracts with Israel


India quietly signed two contracts worth $1.4bn with Israel Aerospace Industries for the purchase of two additional Phalcon/IL-76 Airborne Early Warning and Control Systems (AWACS) valued at $1 billion  and 10 Heron TP unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) during the recent visit of Israeli President Reuven Rivil to India.
The contracts were signed in New Delhi on 16th November in the presence of  Brig. Gen. (Retd) Mishel Ben Baruch, Director, SIBAT, Israel Ministry of Defence and Indian defence secretary G Mohan Kumar.
An Indian Air force (IAF) official said the purchase of two AWACS has been pending for the past five years and the deliveries should be made within the next two to three years. “Phalcon AWACS are tremendous force-multipliers and we are having an excellent experience with them,” the official added.
A $400m contract for the purchase of 10 weaponised Heron TP UAVs was also signed with IAI. Deliveries to the IAF are expected to be completed over the next three years.
According to the IAF official, the Indian Heron TPs will have very sophisticated communication & intelligence systems, detection finders, signal parameters and emitter classification and geo-location capabilities, in addition to electronic surveillance measure for long-range automatic detection and identification of emitting targets.
The official added that Indian Heron TPs will be capable of launching guided munitions and lightweight tactical missiles. Currently the three Indian defence forces operate around 60 Heron UAVs but it is not known whether they are weaponised or not. The three Indian defence forces have a joint requirement of over 200 weaponised UAVs in the next 10 years.
IAI has also given a proposal to India’s Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) to jointly develop an advanced version of Heron UAV in India. However, the ruling National Democratic Alliance government wants all future UAV requirements to be met through the Make in India initiative. Israeli Searcher Mark 1 & II, Heron and Heop UAVs are currently used by Indian defence forces.

 aircosmosinternational

November 23, 2016

Reconnaissance drone to be fitted on the Armata


Reconnaissance drones, capable of scanning the battlefield dozens of kilometres in all directions and providing a clear view and help direct weapons and rockets toward targets Combat, will be fitted on vehicles of the Armata family. These drones, developed by the Moscow Aviation Institute (MAI), can stay in the air indefinitely, as they have no on-board battery. Power is supplied to them through the flexible tether cable from the combat vehicle.
The ‘Pterodactyl’ is a lightweight drone with a shell made of composite materials, connected to the combat vehicle with a flexible cable. The Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) will hover within a radius of 50-100 metres around the combat vehicle and climb to a height of several dozen metres. The ‘Pterodactyl’ will be equipped with radar and a thermal imaging camera.
“The development work continues, but around a year from now, we will send samples for testing to the Defence Ministry,” said Vitaly Polyansky, Senior Research Fellow of the Air Robotics Systems Department of the MAI. “At the moment, we are working on making the drone lighter and increasing its load carrying capacity, but the key element – the tethered system has already been tested in our laboratory, and has fully confirmed all assigned characteristics,” Polyansky told Izvestia.
Compared with drones that are controlled by radio, the Pterodactyl can stay in the air much longer and carry more equipment on board, because it does not have to carry any batteries. Another advantage of the tethered management system, is complete protection against eavesdropping.
Another feature which makes the Pterodactyl unique is that it is made using the tilt-rotor scheme: the aircraft’s propellers can be rotated along with its wings. This allows for the advantages of a helicopter and an aircraft combined in one machine. As a result, the drone can reach high speeds in the air, moving with the tank at full speed, while it is able to levitate in a small area, including directly over the hull of the vehicle.
“The idea of ​​an unmanned intelligence aircraft, managed on a flexible cable, is not new – the first time such a device was used was at the end of the 1960s on a West German unmanned helicopter, the Dornier Do-32K. It was managed by a cable and also received its fuel the same way,” military expert Oleg Zheltonozhko told Izvestia. “Currently, a cable interface is used on the Israeli copter Hovermast, but it is not used as part of a combat vehicle.”
Zheltonozhko said a system in which the reconnaissance drone is directly part of the combat vehicle, does not yet exist.
“The use of a light UAV, equipped with a thermal imaging camera and radar, as an external monitoring system, seems a logical solution for future armoured vehicles, the range of which exceeds the visual range of onboard detection equipment,” said the expert. “For example, the main weapon of the Armata can hit a target at a distance of 8 km, while the recognition of an enemy tank through the sighting channel is limited to 5 km. Because of the Pterodactyl, the tank crew can see the situation on the battlefield, while staying hidden in a shelter or behind buildings or uneven terrain,” he explained.
Zheltonozhko also said that equipping armoured vehicles with external surveillance systems, will enable them to survey the area for a distance of at least 10 km, will provide the Armata with distinct advantages over any of the existing equipment the opponents may possess.

 rbth

With India in MTCR, BrahMos range to be more lethal


Soon after India attended its first plenary meeting as a member of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), the Indian and Russian governments decided to extend the range of the supersonic BrahMos cruise missile, which would make it even more lethal.
 The governments of India and Russia agreed to extend the range of the BrahMos supersonic cruise missile, doubling it to 600 kilometres, soon after India attended the 30th plenary session of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) as a full member.
Sources confirmed to RIR this week that the two countries had agreed, in principle, to increase the range of the BrahMos to almost double its current capacity. However, they denied that India’s membership of the MTCR was directly related to the decision.
An official source categorically said to RIR that increasing the range of the missile was “not, in any way, in contravention to the MTCR.”
According to an official with the Indian Ministry of Defence (MoD) quoted by ‘Defence News,’ a definitive portal on defence-related news and opinion, it had become possible to extend the range of the joint venture BrahMos cruise missile because of India's entry into the Missile Technology Control Regime.

India attended the 30th plenary session of the MTCR held in Busan (South Korea), from October 17 to 21, 2016, for the first time as a member. India joined the MTCR earlier this year, in June.
The MTCR aims to restrict proliferation of missiles, complete rocket systems, unmanned air vehicles and related technology for those systems capable of carrying a 500 kilogramme payload for at least 300 kilometres, as well as systems intended for the delivery of weapons of mass destruction (WMD).
India's entry into the MTCR will help to the extent that Russia and India can acknowledge that the range is above 300 kms.  It has been believed that the range of the BrahMos was specified at 290 kms primarily to avoid complications for Moscow in the transfer of technology and materials for the BrahMos, since Russia has long been a signatory to the MTCR.  BrahMos's range means it falls short of the 300km limit set by the MTCR.
Being a signatory to MTCR does not imply that there are no restrictions in missile technology transfer and trade, particularly when range and lethality are involved.
In this context, sources told RIR that China was not a member of the MTCR and had transferred some missiles to Pakistan, among others (including North Korea) which exceeded the prescribed range of 300kms.
The sources pointed out that India and Russia would not be violating any laws because they were not exporting the extended range missiles but, as members of the MTCR, they could extend the range as the BrahMos was a jointly developed missile and this would be “a natural extension” of joint research efforts.
The agreement to extend the range was among those taken on October 26 at the 16th  Indo-Russian Intergovernmental Commission on Military-Technical Cooperation (IRIGC-MTC), co-chaired by Indian Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar and his Russian counterpart, Gen. Sergei Shoigu.
The defence ministers at the meeting reviewed decisions taken by the leaders (President Vladimir Putin and Prime Minister Narendra Modi) during the India-Russia summit in Goa, and looked at ways to expedite the agreements while looking at further areas to move ahead.
Defence News quoted a scientist with the Indian Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) who said, "only very minor changes in software and hardware are required" to increase the range of the supersonic missile. 
“BrahMos is a world-class weapons system and there is no equivalent in the world today. Speed, precision and power, all exists in this system," Praveen Pathak, a spokesman for the manufacturing firm BrahMos Aerospace Limited told Sputnik.
BrahMos Aerospace, co-owned by the Indian and Russian governments, manufactures the supersonic cruise missile, named after two rivers, the Brahmaputra and the Moskva.
Since BrahMos conforms to the characteristics of the Russian P-800 Oniks/Yakhont anti-ship missile, no major modification is required to achieve 600-kilometres range, said Rahul Bhonsle, a retired Brigadier and Editor of ‘Strategic Foresight Asia’ which closely follows and covers all defence-related issues. Modifications to the missile would, however, be required to provide greater stability over the longer range and corresponding accuracy.
Bhonsle said operationally, the increase in range would overcome restrictions of deployment for the ground based version of the missile. “This will extend the area of influence as well as provide greater flexibility in employment. On the other hand, for the naval and the yet to be deployed air launched version (to be fitted on to the Su-35MKI) this will provide the advantage of extension of range in engagement as well as standoff distance,” the military analyst pointed out.
A source told RIR that the move was still at the planning stage and it would be several years before the project was fulfilled, but declined to specify any time frame.

 rbth

India bolsters Western Fleet ASW capability with Kolkata destroyer


The Indian Navy will assign the newly inducted Project 15A Kolkata-class guided-missile destroyer, INS Chennai, to the service's Western Naval Command, the country's defence ministry confirmed in a statement on 21 November.
Chennai, which was commissioned in Mumbai on the same day, is the navy's third Kolkata platform, and the last Project 15A variant in the class.
According to IHS Jane's Fighting Ships, Chennai is 163.95 m long, 17.71 m in beam, and has a 5.4 m draught. It has a top speed of 32 kt, and a standard range of 4,500 n miles at 18 kt.
With a prominent anti-submarine warfare (ASW) capability, the ship's submarine prosecution capacity is provided by indigenously developed twin-tube torpedo launchers, Russian made RBU-6000 rocket launchers, and the HUMSA-NG hull-mounted sonar.
IHS Jane's reported on 21 November that the platform is entering service without its Atlas Elektronik low-frequency Active Towed-Array Sonar (ACTAS) system, although this is expected to be fitted "soon", according to Indian Navy spokesperson Captain D K Sharma.
Upon completing further sea trials, Chennai will be homeported in Mumbai on India's western coast.

janes

November 22, 2016

Parrikar sees need for rethink of submarine building plan


The country should rethink its submarine building programme and expand its fleet beyond the planned 24, Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar said on Tuesday.
This represents a major change in policy with growing underwater strength of Pakistan and China in the Indian Ocean.
The Minister was speaking at a joint Navy-FICCI seminar, ‘Current and future challenges in design and construction of underwater vessels’.
The government had approved an ambitious “30-year submarine construction plan” in 1999 for building 24 conventional submarines till 2030. This was later converted to include nuclear attack submarines as well.
“We need to rethink about the real requirement based on our projection… We also need to assure that the skilled manpower and skills developed we need to retain it. To retain it, we need to have more construction of submarines,” Mr. Parrikar said.

Critically short of submarines

However the plan has been delayed with only one programme approved so far — Project-75 — for six Scorpenes being built under by the Mazgaon Docks Limited (MDL) with technology transfer from DCNS of France. The Navy is also set to induct the first of the Scorpene in January and the remaining five at nine month intervals.
The Navy is critically short of submarines, the most potent naval platforms, with 14 operational platforms,  including one nuclear attack submarine leased from Russia. But with regular maintenance and high turnaround times the actual availability is much less.
A new plan to build the next line of submarines under Project-75I has been held up due to delay in formulating the guidelines for the proposed ‘strategic partnerships’ model under the Defence Procurement Procedure 2016,  which Mr. Parrikar said would be finalised very soon.
“It [strategic partnerships] has already been approved and the drafting of the chapters is under way. Approval is needed by the Defence Acquisition Council [DAC] and probably by the Cabinet as well as it has financial implications,” Mr. Parrikar said, adding that once the strategic partnership model was approved Project-75I would be fast-tracked.
In this context, Mr. Parrikar called for higher level of indigenisation in submarine building. “Indigenisation in Scorpenes is not up to the mark but in the Advanced Technology Vessel [ATV] programme [nuclear submarines], it is over 70 per cent,” he observed.

 thehindu

November 21, 2016

Largest-ever 'Made-in-India' warship INS Chennai commissioned


INS Chennai, a Kolkata-class destroyer ship, was commissioned into the Indian Navy's combat fleet on Monday.  Defence minister Manohar Parrikar today commissioned the warship at the naval dockyard in Mumbai.  INS Chennai is the largest-ever warship to be built in India.  Built at the Mazagon Dock Shipbuilders Ltd in Mumbai, the ship's construction also marks the end of the Project 15A to build Kolkata-class guided missile destroyers.  Chief of the Naval Staff, Admiral Sunil Lanba, was also present on the occasion.
 "The ship is equipped with a decoy that can divert a missile attack. Nearly 60% of the ship was built at Mazagon Dock, while weapons and sensors were brought from Israel and Russia. Destroyers are second only to aircraft carriers in projecting raw combat power," said an official.  "The ship is designed to carry and operate up to two multi-role combat helicopters," said vice-admiral Girish Luthra (chief of naval command western command).  The Navy plans to become a 200-warship force with around 600 aircraft and helicopters by 2027.
 INS Chennai will be placed under the operational and administrative control of the Western Naval Command.  The ship will undergo certain additional sea trials of the ship-borne systems before being assigned to the Western Fleet and based in Mumbai. INS Chennai is 164 metres long with a displacement of over 7,500 tonnes, and sails at a top speed of over 30 knots (around 55 kms) per hour.
 Armed with supersonic surface-to-surface BrahMos missiles and Barak-8 Long Rang Surface-to-Air missiles, its undersea warfare capability includes indigenously developed anti-submarine weapons and sensors, prominently the hull-mounted sonar HUMSA-NG, heavyweight torpedo tube launchers, rocket launchers and towed array sonar capability.

For defence against enemy missiles, INS Chennai is fitted with 'Kavach' chaff decoy system and for protection from enemy torpedoes, has 'Mareech' torpedo decoy system, both developed in India.

A potent platform capable of undertaking a variety of tasks and missions spanning the full spectrum of maritime warfare, she can carry and operated two multi-role helicopters. INS Chennai is propelled by a powerful combined gas and propulsion plant consisting of four reversible gas turbines.


Her very high level of automation with sophisticated digital networks on board includes ATM-based integrated ship data network, combat management systems, automatic power management system and auxiliary control system.The ship's crest depicts the outline of the iconic Fort St George of Chennai in the background, a part of the adjacent beach and a sloop on blue and white waves.

The crew of the ship abides by the Sanskrit motto 'Shatro Sanharaka' meaning Vanquisher of Enemies, epitomizing the warrior spirit and strong resolve to prevail and succeed in combat.
- timesofindia

DRDO ties up with Snecma to revive gas turbine engine for Tejas


India’s defence research agency has signed a deal with French engine maker Snecma to revive and certify the Kaveri engine, before powering a flight of Tejas light combat aircraft prototype by 2018. Snecma, as part of the offsets deal for the 36 Rafale jets India bought for its air force, would handhold the Gas turbine and research establishment (GTRE), which has designed Kaveri, to fix gaps in its performance, address safety concerns, certify and fly it on a Tejas light combat aircraft.
The Rs 600 odd crore expense for Snecma, which powers the Rafale jets, would be adjusted against the 50 per cent offsets that it is mandated to spend in India. The Kaveri project has been on the backburner for nearly a decade after GTRE, an agency of Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), struggled to reduce its weight and improve its performance needed to power the fighter. So far, the government has spent Rs 2,100 crore on the engine that has tested on ground for over 3,000 hours and around 30 hours on a IL-76 transport plane in Russia. It has a marine variant that the Navy is testing and it is in talks with Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd and the Indian Railways to power rail engines. “Once the engine houses make it a flightworthy engine, we have numerous programmes coming up and there is more than one place for it to be fitted.
The question is whether we will be able to fit it into only the LCA or will we be able to get it into the (GE) 414 with the higher power is a point that we are raising,” said C P Ramanarayanan, DRDO Director General for Aeronautics cluster said. The Indian Air Force has ordered for over 120 single engine Tejas fighters powered by a General Electric 404 engine, the powerplant the aircraft first flew in January 2001. So far the Tejas has flown nearly 3,300 sorties, which includes sorties by IAF chief Arup Raha and the air chief of Turkmenistan. An upgraded Mark-2 aircraft of Tejas is being designed for a more heavier GE-414 engine by 2025, and the DRDO hopes that the upgraded Kaveri would qualify for the plane by then.If not, the Kaveri would power other programmes such as Ghatak, the unmanned combat aircraft vehicle of UCAV, for which studies have begun by the research agency.
 “So we have Ghatak in our hand, we have so many other programmes coming up. Anyway we have to have indigenous engine development also. All that we are trying to do is trying to allocate one of the prototype for this and make use of some of the offset for this hand holding if possible,” said Ramnarayanan. India is among the few countries in the world such as Russia, Britain, US and France to have capabilities to build a gas turbine engine.The chief of Aeronautical Development Agency Commodore C D Balaji said that the agency expects around 40 aircraft of the 123 planes ordered by the IAF would be delivered by 2020 and the remaining 83 by 2025. He said the Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd is doubling its production of Tejas to 16 from eight. 
businessstandard

November 19, 2016

Deliveries of 36 Rafale Fighter Jets To Commence From September 2019


Following the signing of an Inter-Governmental Agreement (IGA) along with Aircraft & Weapons Package Supply Protocols and Technical Arrangement with the French Government on 23rd September, 2016 for procurement of 36 Rafale aircraft in fly-away condition, the deliveries of the fighter jets will commence from September, 2019, Dr Subhash Bhamre informed the Lok Sabha on November 18, 2016.
The Rs 58,000 crore deal executed by India to purchase 36 Rafale fighter jets from France is undoubtedly one the most well negotiated pacts and one that will bring along huge gains for the domestic aviation industry besides creating job openings for the people of India.
This deal is the first since the purchase of Sukhois from Russia in the late 90s and is considered a win-win for India, the most significant feature of this contract being the enhancements for India which even French aircrafts do not have.
In an exclusive chat with DefenceAviationPost.com soon after the signing of the deal, Union Defence Minister, Manohar Parrikar said, “In any foreign deal, there are 3-4 things that have to be taken care of. First is the cost, which we have negotiated at a much lesser price than the earlier price being quoted by the French team.”
It is noteworthy to point here that the 7.878 billion Euros deal has been clinched at a price that is 750 million euros less than what was quoted by the French team in January 2016.
“Second is the percentage of offsets which in this case is much higher than any other foreign military sales so far. This creates a huge potential for the domestic aviation industry and is in line with the Prime Minister’s Make in India initiative,” the minister said.
It may be mentioned here that deal comes with a 50% offset clause which means that Indian companies will get businesses worth over 3 billion euros or Rs 22,500 crores.
Parrikar said the most significant feature of this contract are the enhancements for India which even French aircrafts do not have.
Firstly, these fighter jets come along with state-of-the-art missile weaponry profile that increases the strike capabilities of the IAF to a great extent. It includes Meteor Beyond Visual Range (BVR) air-to-air missile with a range in excess 150 kms. Then it also comes along with Scalp (Pointed Offence) which is a long range air to surface cruise missile with a range of over 300 kms.
Further, these fighter jets will be customised in line with the requirements of the IAF and will include Helmet Mounted Displays, radar warning receiver, infrared search and track among others.
“So from all directions it is a win-win deal for India. Rafale is a potent aircraft and will add to the capability of the IAF,” the minister added.
Experts say that Rafale coming fitted with Meteors and Scalp will shake up Pakistan Air Force hugely and PLAAF (air warfare branch of China) to a fair extent.
They added that the enhancements negotiated under the deal for 36 Rafale means that India’s adversaries will need four modern fighter jets to counter one Rafale. Simply put, the enemy will need four Su30 or four F16D (latest acquired by Pakistan) or four JF17 (which again Pakistan has) to counter one Rafale with its existing capabilities.
“This 1:4 ratio will clearly give Indian an edge over its adversaries and the deal for 36 Rafale is equivalent to procuring 144 modern fighter jets,” an official said requesting anonymity.
Timelines is another major aspect of this deal. The deliveries of fighter jets will start in 36 months and completed in 18 months thereon.
Under the contract, the French manufacturer Dassault has to ensure that 75% of the fleet or 27 fighters are operationally available at any given time.

 defenceaviationpost

‘Russian Helicopters’ could localise Mi-17 production in India



If the Ka-226T helicopters, assembled in India, are successfully exported to neighbouring countries, the localised assembly model could be used for other helicopters as well. 
 Alexander Mikheev, CEO of the Russian Helicopters Holding company, (a Rostec member) does not rule out the possibility of localising production of the Mi-17 helicopters in India.
“At the moment, we have no plans to localise Mi-17 production in India, but we also do not rule out such a possibility in the future,” Mikheev said in an interview with the Indian blog Livefist.
He said if the Ka-226T helicopters, which will be assembled in India, are successfully sold in the markets of neighbouring countries, the localisation experience could be replicated for other models of helicopters.
Russia handed over the final batch of three Mi-17V-5 military transport helicopters to India in February this year, under a previously signed contract, which entailed a total of 151 helicopters, built by the Kazan Helicopter Plant, (part of the Russian Helicopters company). India also approved the purchase of 48 additional Mi-17V-5 helicopters.
The new helicopters are for use in operations in various sectors, including in the desert and in mountainous terrain.
Mi-17 military transport helicopters are among the most popular helicopters in their class. These helicopters were built incorporating a full-spectrum analysis of Russian helicopters' operation in combat situations and conflict zones. It is the universality and high flight capabilities of these helicopters that make them among the world's most popular Russian-made helicopters.
The latest Mi-8/17 military transport helicopter family includes the Mi-17V-5 (domestic designation Mi-8MTV-5) made at Kazan Helicopters and the Mi-171Sh (Mi-8AMTSh) made at Ulan-Ude Aviation Plant.
Mi-17V-5 (Mi-8MTV-5) and Mi-171Sh (Mi-8AMTSh) helicopters are designed to transport personnel, and for carrying cargo internally or on an external sling. They can be used for search and rescue operations, and can also be equipped with weapons.
India and Russia formally inked an agreement on October 15, 2016, to create a joint venture to produce Ka-226T helicopters in India. The agreement was part of the outcome of the Russia-India summit in Goa.
Signing the JV agreement marked a new stage of cooperation between Russia and India in the helicopter industry, first outlined in the intergovernmental agreement between Moscow and New Delhi in December 2015.  The JV will become a pilot project for the Russian-Indian part of the “Make in India” programme.
"The joint venture is certainly a breakthrough project for us, because it fundamentally changes the model of our cooperation within the helicopter industry. For the first time we are ready to offer our deep localisation of helicopters, including the set up for production of various helicopter components and assemblies. I hope that the Ka-226T assembled in India has a great future in the world market," Russian Helicopters CEO Mikheev said in October.

"The joint venture for local production of Ka-226T is a profoundly new and substantial step in the development of cooperation between India and Russia. The fleet of Russian-made helicopters in India is over 400 units. But this is the first of such large-scale complex agreements for delivery and production of new helicopters in the amount of 200 units, which is fully in line with the Make in India initiative," said Sergei Chemezov, Rostec CEO. "In addition, over the next 5 years there will be facilities set up for maintenance and servicing of the produced helicopters. Therefore the agreement represents not just a contract for production but for full lifecycle support."
Under terms of the intergovernmental agreement, the joint Russian-Indian enterprise created by Russian Helicopters, JSC Rosoboronexport and India's HAL Corporation must arrange the localisation of production and supply of 200 light multirole Ka-226T for 9 years. The first 60 helicopters will be produced in Russia, while production of the remaining 140 helicopters is being planned in India.
In addition to the assembly, the agreement provides for maintenance, operation, repairs and technical support cooperation.

 rbth

Israel expresses commitment towards 'Make in India' in defence sector


Israel on Friday expressed its commitment for `Make in India and Make with India` in the security domain, said a industry release.
Participating at a `Round table on Indo-Israel Cooperation in Defence & Homeland Security`, Israeli Defence Ministry`s international defence cooperation directorate (SIBAT) chief Brig. Gen. Mishel Ben Baruch (retd.) said: "We are willing to cooperate with India and transfer technologies through partnership with Indian companies. SIBAT and Ministry of Defence of Israel are committed for a long term relationship with India."
He called the event, organised by Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI), "historic" and "an opportunity to find ways to enhance cooperation between India and Israel in these areas"."
Defence Ministry Joint Secretary (Planning & International Cooperation) Shambhu S. Kumaran said: "In India, defence production is set to shift from public sector to private companies and offset programme of the country is also taking shape with a target of $10 billion in next 5 years."
Emphasising on the high degree of trust shared between the two countries and the growing concern of cyber threat, Kumaran called it one of the areas where India and Israel could collaborate.
Israel is one of the leading exporters of weapon systems to India, providing missiles, unmanned aircrafts, electronic warfare and radars in last decade.
PTI

Pakistan has 130-140 nuclear weapons, converts F16 to deliver nukes, claims US report


 Pakistan is expanding its nuclear arsenal and has developed an estimated stockpile of 130 to 140 warheads for delivery as well as converting some of its fighter jets, including F-16s to deliver nukes, Bulletin of Atomic Scientists said in its latest report.

Authored by Hans M Kristensen and Robert S Norris, the report says that analysis of a large number of commercial satellite images of Pakistan army's garrisons and air force bases shows what appear to be mobile launchers and underground facilities that might be related to nuclear forces.

"Pakistan continues to expand its nuclear arsenal with more warheads, more delivery systems, and a growing fissile materials production industry," said the report on Pakistani nuclear forces, 2016.

"We estimate that Pakistan now has a nuclear weapons stockpile of 130-140 warheads. This stockpile exceeds the projection made by the US Defense Intelligence Agency in 1999 that Pakistan by 2020 would have 60-80 warheads," said the report released last month.

According to the scientists, with several delivery systems in development, four plutonium production reactors and its uranium enrichment facilities expanding, Pakistan's stockpile will possibly increase further over the next 10 years. "Speculation that Pakistan may become the world's third-largest nuclear weapon state - with a stockpile of some 350 warheads a decade from now - are, we believe, exaggerated, not least because that would require a buildup two to three times faster than growth over the past two decades," it said.

"We estimate that its stockpile could more realistically grow to 220-250 warheads by 2025, if the current trend continues. If that happens, it would make Pakistan the world's fifth-largest nuclear weapon state.

"But unless India significantly expands its arsenal or further builds up its conventional forces, it seems reasonable to expect that Pakistan's nuclear arsenal will not continue to grow indefinitely but might begin to level off as its current weapons programmes are completed," the report said.
 According to the report, Pakistan probably assigns a nuclear strike mission to select F-16A/B and Mirage III/V fighter squadrons.
The F-16 was probably the first aircraft in the nuclear role, but the Mirage quickly joined the mission, it said, adding that the F-16A/Bs were supplied by the US between 1983 and 1987.
 US State Department told Congress in 1989, "none of the F-16s Pakistan already owns or is about to purchase is configured for nuclear delivery" and Pakistan "will be obligated by contract not to modify" additional F-16s "without the approval of the United States," it said.
"Yet, there were multiple credible reports at the time that Pakistan was already modifying US-supplied F-16s for nuclear weapons," it said, adding that there are rumors that Pakistan intends to make the Chinese-supplied JF-17 fighter nuclear-capable.


timesofindia

INS Chennai, among the largest indigenous destroyers, to be commissioned into Navy


Union Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar is scheduled to commission the ship ‘INS Chennai’, an indigenously designed and constructed Kolkata-class guided missile destroyer, into the Indian Navy. INS Chennai is among the largest destroyers constructed in India and has been built by Mazagaon Dock Shipbuilders Limited, Mumbai.
Following the commissioning, INS Chennai will be placed under the operational and administrative control of the Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Western Naval Command. On completion of some additional sea trials of ship-borne systems, the ship will be assigned to the Western Fleet and would be based in Mumbai.The ship is among the largest destroyers constructed in India, with a length overall of 164 meters and displacement of over 7,500 tons. The ship is a potent platform capable of undertaking a variety of tasks and missions, spanning the full spectrum of maritime warfare. Armed with supersonic Surface-to-Surface ‘BrahMos’ missiles, and ‘Barak-8’ Long Range Surface to Air missiles, the ship possesses formidable prowess of missile technology. The undersea warfare capable boasts of indigenously developed anti-submarine weapons and sensors, prominently the Hull Mounted Sonar ‘HUMSA-NG’, Heavyweight Torpedo Tube Launchers, Rocket Launchers and Towed Arrau sonar capability.

For defence against enemy missiles, the ship is fitted with ‘Kavach’ chaff decoy system and for defence against enemy torpedoes, it is fitted with ‘Mareech’ torpedo decoy system, both developed indigenously in India. The ship is designed to carry and operate up to two multi-role helicopters.
INS Kolkata the first ship of the class was commissioned on 16 August 2014 and INS Kochi the second ship of the class was commissioned last year on 30 September 2015.

 indianexpress

November 18, 2016

Boeing Unveils An AMCA ‘Sweetener’


As Boeing Defense revives its campaign for the F/A-18 Super Hornet in India, a slide in its presentation today on the pitch stands out significant and adds telling detail to an aspect of the effort that has remained relatively unknown — how India’s proposed Make In India Fighter programme ties in with the country’s concept fifth generation development AMCA platform. We now know that Boeing has a very specific plan, with three major thrusts:
First, as the slide most visibly suggests, Boeing proposes that the manufacturing facility and supply eco-system that it builds up for the F/A-18 in India in the event it is chosen, could be used to produce the AMCA. The existing facility could be leveraged, precluding the need for a greenfield setup elsewhere.
 Second, also mentioned specifically in the slide is the GE 414 enhanced engine pitch. Significant. Boeing here is proposing engine commonality from the get-go to support the prospective selection of the Super Hornet platform. Both Boeing and GE are in ‘multiple stakeholder discussions’ with the DRDO, Indian Air Force (and, presumably the MoD) on this aspect, said Boeing India President Pratyush Kumar during a presentation by Dan Gillian, Boeing’s VP on the F/A-18 programme headquartered at St Louis . The enhanced GE 414 would be a feature on the Advanced Super Hornet proposed as part of the Make In India pitch. How this ties in with India’s own engine development efforts and opportunities remains unclear. The indigenisation thrust need to ensure the Kaveri effort hasn’t gone to waste — the AMCA could potentially be India’s last indigenous manned fighter project for the next three-four decades.

Finally, there is the suggestion that Boeing could be available to help along the AMCA programme directly as a partner or consultant in such a way that it makes the Block 2 Super Hornet -> Advanced Super Hornet -> AMCA flow more seamlessly from a development-to-manufacturing perspective.
This is an aggressive pitch that amplifies the sort of deep dive that competitors for the MIIF deal could be willing to put on the table. It also has several implications on the dynamics of partnerships and indigenous development from the ground up for a programme that will be infinitely more complex than not just a flyaway deal — but also the aborted M-MRCA.

 shiv aroor

India's indigenous Rustom-II UAV completes maiden flight


India's locally developed Rustom-II medium-altitude long-endurance unmanned aerial vehicle (MALE UAV) completed its maiden test flight at the aeronautical test range in Chitradurga, near Bangalore, on 16 November.
Official sources told IHS Jane's that the test flight was limited to a 100 km range even though the UAV's operational range to conduct intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) missions for all three of India's services is expected to reach to 250 km.
India's Ministry of Defence (MoD) said in a statement that the test flight achieved the main objectives of testing the platform's capabilities such as take-off, banking, level flying, and landing.
Developed by the Aeronautical Development Establishment of India's Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) and Bharat Electronics Limited, the first prototype of the 1.8-tonne multimission UAV - known as TAPAS 201 - has a 21 m wingspan, a capacity payload of 350 kg, an endurance of over 24 hours, and an operational ceiling of 10,660 m (34,776 feet), according to the MoD.
The public sector Hindustan Aeronautics Limited is also a production partner in the programme.
The MoD said that the Rustom-II/TAPAS 201 is capable of carrying medium- and long-range optic sensors, synthetic aperture radar, electronic intelligence, communication intelligence, and situational awareness payloads for round-the-clock operations.
The UAV is powered by two Russian NPO Saturn 36T turboprop engines rated at 100 hp each. The UAV's airframe, landing gear, digital flight control, avionic, and navigational systems have all been sourced locally from public and private sector companies.
DRDO officials said the Rustom-II/TAPAS 201 would undertake further trials to validate its design parameters before conducting user trials with the respective services.
The UAV is a derivative of the Rustom-I, which conducted its first test flight in October 2010 and was designed primarily as a test bed for more advanced variants. However, DRDO sources said that the Rustom-I is also expected to enter limited service, possibly with the Indian Navy.

Janes

US approves USD31.2 billion of fighter sales to the Middle East

The US State Department has cleared long-delayed fighter aircraft sales to the Middle East valued at USD31.2 billion.

Two notifications posted on the Defense Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) website on 17 November announced the approval of 40 Boeing F/A-18E/F Super Hornets for Kuwait and 72 Boeing F-15 Advanced Eagles for Qatar, valued at USD10.1 billion and USD21.1 billion respectively. Both sales were requested some years ago, but had reportedly been held up owing to concerns raised by Israel.The Kuwaiti sale covers 32 single-seat F/A-18E and eight twin-seat F/A-18F aircraft, as well as 12 Lockheed Martin AN/AAQ-33 Sniper pods, 48 Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing Systems (JHMCS), and other equipment and support. Kuwait is the first customer to request an element of Boeing's International Roadmap upgrade for the Super Hornet, with the notification also listing eight conformal fuel tanks for four of its aircraft.

Once in service, the F/A-18E/Fs will initially augment the Kuwait Air Force's current 39 Boeing F/A-18C/D Hornets and the 28 yet-to-be delivered Eurofighter Typhoons, before eventually replacing the legacy Hornets.
The Qatari sale covers 72 F-15QA (Qatar Advanced) Eagles as well as weapons and related support equipment. Lead-in fighter training in the United States is also included. The Advanced Eagle is the latest variant of the Boeing-made fighter that has also been ordered by Saudi Arabia as the F-15SA. This variant improves on previous models in that it features two additional underwing weapons stations (increasing the number from nine to 11); the option of a large area display cockpit; fly-by-wire controls; and the Raytheon APG-63(V)3 active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar.
Along with 24 Dassault Rafales that were ordered in May 2015, in Qatar Emiri Air Force service the F-15QAs will replace the service's current 12 Dassault Mirage 2000-5 fighters.
The DSCA notifications represent the total number of fighters that the State Department has approved, and are not necessarily the number that each nation will procure (Qatar, for example, has already had a portion of its total 72-aircraft requirement satisfied with the Rafale).

 Janes

India Yet to Give a Green Signal For Naval Air Defence Missile: MBDA


European missile major MBDA on Thursday said that it is waiting for the green light from India's Defence Ministry to finalise its negotiation with the DRDO on naval air defence missile.
"SR-SAM is at very final stage, we have addressed all the topics linked to design, work share, future production, content of technology transfer (ToT); all this has been discussed with customer, DRDO and BDL," Loic Piedevache, country head, India, MBDA group, said on the sidelines of the MBDA organised workshop on missile technologies for Indian armed forces.
"Now we need final green light from MoD to finalise our discussion and negotiation with DRDO," he added.
Defence Research and Development Organisation is the lead organisation for the design and development of the Short Range Surface to Air Missiles (SR-SAM) for the Indian Navy, while Bharat Dynamics Ltd is the ministry's missile production enterprise.
On the partnership arrangement for the under-development missile, Loic said: "It is a partnership. DRDO is the designer of the complete system, BDL is the production agency and MBDA is a strategic partner bringing its expertise and ToT of crucial items of the SR-SAM."
On how quickly the missile can be delivered, he said: "First deliveries will start in three years after signing the contract and all the deliveries will be completed within five years."
With the MBDA having designed the missile for range longer than the required range of 15 kms, Loic, giving the rationale, said: "We realised that when SR-SAM will be manufactured in India, it will be an Indian missile and there is a very strong export potential.
"So, taking into consideration the operational requirements and export potential because there is no such missile today in the market. The design has been done to go for higher range of 40 plus km."
SR-SAM is very crucial for the defence of a ship at high sea against the anti-ship missiles and aircraft.

 news18

November 17, 2016

India seeks early induction of gen next T-90 tanks


Tensions along the India-Pakistan border have spurred the Indian army to seek early delivery of the T-90MS tanks from Russia. A contract for 64 of these gen next tanks has already been signed.
Heightened tensions between India and Pakistan have seen the Indian Army seeking to bolster its firepower. Tensions along the border between the two countries have taken a toll, with casualties on both sides and, on Monday, the Pakistan Foreign Office summoned the Indian envoy to protest the killing of seven of its soldiers on the border.

Defence Ministry sources said the Indian Army is keen to induct the latest version of the T-90 tanks as soon as possible. India has inked a contract for 64 next gen T 90 tanks. The army wants the order to be split between direct imports and domestic production to induct all tanks as quickly as possible.
The T-90 is the third generation Russian tank known for its fire power. The export version of the new T-90MS tanks includes fragmentation projectiles with remote detonation to cause further havoc in adversary’s ranks. 
However, the army is not satisfied with the pace of domestic production and wants some of the tanks to be imported directly from Russia.
The T-90MS is the latest version of the famed Russian T–series of tanks. The India-Russia T-90MS tank will improve manoeuverability along the border, and send a strong signal to Pakistan.
The Indian military earlier had approved a $ 2 billion contract for purchase of 464 Russian T-90MS ‘Tagil’ tanks. The Uralvagonzavod management, which makes the T-90, considers the tank most suitable for the Indian army’s rearmament programme for a new main battle tank.
The Indian Defence Acquisitions Council (DAC), chaired by India's Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar, has pre-approved an armaments modernization project for the Indian armed forces for a total sum of 821 billion rupees (over $ 12 billion), the Times of India (TOI) had reported. 
According to the report in the TOI, what has been approved is the purchase of 83 fourth-generation Indian light multipurpose fighter aircraft Tejas Mark-1A and 464 Russian T-90 tanks, and 6 additional regiments of the Indian MRLS ‘Pinaka’.
India plans to set up a licensed assembly plant for the armoured forces through the Ministry of Defence Ordnance Factory Board.
“T-90MS will replace the older T-72 tanks. It addresses some of the shortcomings of the T-90, is easily transportable and less weighty. The domestically made Arjun tanks were originally suited for the terrain in the border states of Punjab and Rajasthan. But increasing population centres and an enhanced network of canals have limited its areas of deployment and operations. This is where T-90MS will be more useful because they are lighter and more manoeuverable. The low ground pressure of T-90 MS tanks is an advantage in the soft sands of Rajasthan and mud of Punjab. “Therefore, T-90MS tanks are well suited for the Indian army,” Major General (Retd) G D Bakshi, a military analyst, was quoted as saying.
The Indian army plans to stop commissioning T-72 tanks in 2025-2030 and replace them with the average main battle tanks of the future. The project is known in India as the FRCV (Future Ready Combat Vehicle). The Russian T-90MS (upgraded T-90S) meets all parameters and could come under the new Indian tank fleet upgrade, said the UVZ CEO.
The T-90 went through baptism of fire in Syria in the spring of 2016. Sources of RNS agency in the Russian Ministry of Defence explained that, at the end of 2015, a large consignment of Russian T-90A tanks, which had previously operated in the Russian army, were delivered in Syria. Syrian tank crews even trained on the Russian sites. According to the agency, the T-90A tanks were first used by the Syrian army near the city of Aleppo, ensuring protection of the Syrian army assault groups.
The T-90 battle tank, built from 1980-1990 on the base of the T-72B, was named ‘Vladimir’ in honour of head designer Vladimir Potkin. The T-90MS is a modernized version of the tank’s export model, named ‘Tagil’. It is equipped with a 125-mm smoothbore gun – 2A46M-5 launcher, guided by missiles with laser-guided sight with thermal imager. The maximum sighting range of the armour-piercing shells is 4,000 m, and high-explosive shells – up to 9,600 m.
The maximum range of the direct shot at the target height of 2 m. is 2120 m. The tank is also protected with dynamic protection against chemical and armour-piercing shells. At the customer’s request, the active protection Arena-E system to combat anti-tank guided missiles can be installed in the T-90MS.

 rbth

November 16, 2016

Boeing in fray for Indian Air Force's tanker contest


The Indian Air Force’s (IAF’s) withdrawal of a tender earlier this year for the $2 billion purchase of six multi-role tanker transport (MRTT) aircraft has set the stage for the entry of Boeing into this contest. The American company had not responded to two earlier tenders, since it did not have a suitable aircraft to field. Now, having developed a brand new MRTT for the US Air Force (USAF), Boeing is poised to compete with Airbus and Ilyushin, the two vendors who have vied for the IAF order for a decade. An earlier IAF tender, floated in 2006, attracted bids from Airbus, Spain, which offered a modified Airbus 330-200 aircraft; and from Russia’s Ilyushin, which offered the Ilyushin-78 tanker — six of which were already in the IAF since 2003-04. Yet, despite successive IAF chief’s emphasising the urgency of buying tankers quickly, that tender was withdrawn in 2010.
A second tender, issued by the IAF soon after, was withdrawn in May. The reason for withdrawal was a conflict between “procurement cost” and “life cycle cost”.
The Russian tanker was cheaper to buy; but the Spanish tanker worked out cheaper when life cycle costs were evaluated — considering not just the acquisition cost, but also the cost of operation, maintenance and spare parts over a service life of 30-40 years. Tankers are valuable force multipliers for air forces that operate combat aircraft for long distances. Mid-air refuelling almost doubles the capability of fighters. Refuelling them mid-mission saves a trip back to base, and a landing and takeoff. At Everett, outside Seattle, USA, where Boeing builds commercial airliners in the world’s largest building — a hangar one kilometre long and half a kilometre wide — the first few KC-46A Pegasus tankers are being built on the airframe of the long-haul Boeing 767-200 airliner.
The USAF has already ordered 179 KC-46A, and that order would increase incrementally to 400 or so, as the USAF’s vintage KC-135 — built on the Boeing 707 airframe and already over half a century old — are progressively retired. In contrast, the Airbus 330 MRTT has just 51 tankers on order. Boeing believes its economy of scale would create an unbeatable cost advantage. Says Glenn Hanbey, the Pegasus marketing head: “The KC-46A is not just a civil airliner that can carry extra fuel. It has been developed as a military aircraft, to the demanding specifications of the USAF.” Hanbey is referring to the Airbus 330 MRTT, which carries more fuel than the KC-46A Pegasus — 111 tonnes, as against 96 tonnes — but which remains in many respects a civilian airliner that retains commercial-style seating inside for 291 passengers. In contrast, the KC-46A Pegasus has military style “palletised” seating that can be quickly bolted on for up to 160 passengers. In a medical evacuation role, it can carry 54 stretchers with patients, along with on-board emergency oxygen.
To permit large cargo loads, the Pegasus has giant side doors, the size of those on the C-17 Globemaster III cargo plane. A key feature of the KC-46A is its tanker-specific avionics, with the twin-pilot cockpit fitted with state-of-the-art displays developed for the 787 Dreamliner. In accordance with USAF demands, the “boom operator”, who operates the attachment that protrudes from the tail of the Pegasus and pumps fuel at 1,200 gallons per minute into the aircraft being refuelled, has a three-dimensional view of the operation from seven cameras that look to the rear. The pilots too view the operation, allowing them to position their tanker aircraft suitably.
For now, the Airbus 330 MRTT enjoys a first-mover advantage, having already logged orders from the air forces of Australia (seven tankers), United Kingdom (14) France (nine), Saudi Arabia (seven), The Netherlands (two), Singapore (six), South Korea (four) and UAE (three). But Pratyush Kumar, Boeing’s chief in India argues: “Those orders were placed when the KC-46A hadn’t entered service. Now, it provides India an additional option — one that consumes 30 per cent less fuel, is 20 per cent cheaper to operate, and that is derived from an aircraft with a dispatch reliability rate of 99.7 per cent.”

business-standard
The Indian Air Force’s (IAF’s) withdrawal of a tender earlier this year for the $2 billion purchase of six multi-role tanker transport (MRTT) aircraft has set the stage for the entry of Boeing into this contest. The American company had not responded to two earlier tenders, since it did not have a suitable aircraft to field. Now, having developed a brand new MRTT for the US Air Force (USAF), Boeing is poised to compete with Airbus and Ilyushin, the two vendors who have vied for the IAF order for a decade. An earlier IAF tender, floated in 2006, attracted bids from Airbus, Spain, which offered a modified Airbus 330-200 aircraft; and from Russia’s Ilyushin, which offered the Ilyushin-78 tanker — six of which were already in the IAF since 2003-04. Yet, despite successive IAF chief’s emphasising the urgency of buying tankers quickly, that tender was withdrawn in 2010. A second tender, issued by the IAF soon after, was withdrawn in May. The reason for withdrawal was a conflict between “procurement cost” and “life cycle cost”. The Russian tanker was cheaper to buy; but the Spanish tanker worked out cheaper when life cycle costs were evaluated — considering not just the acquisition cost, but also the cost of operation, maintenance and spare parts over a service life of 30-40 years. Tankers are valuable force multipliers for air forces that operate combat aircraft for long distances. Mid-air refuelling almost doubles the capability of fighters. Refuelling them mid-mission saves a trip back to base, and a landing and takeoff. At Everett, outside Seattle, USA, where Boeing builds commercial airliners in the world’s largest building — a hangar one kilometre long and half a kilometre wide — the first few KC-46A Pegasus tankers are being built on the airframe of the long-haul Boeing 767-200 airliner. The USAF has already ordered 179 KC-46A, and that order would increase incrementally to 400 or so, as the USAF’s vintage KC-135 — built on the Boeing 707 airframe and already over half a century old — are progressively retired. In contrast, the Airbus 330 MRTT has just 51 tankers on order. Boeing believes its economy of scale would create an unbeatable cost advantage. Says Glenn Hanbey, the Pegasus marketing head: “The KC-46A is not just a civil airliner that can carry extra fuel. It has been developed as a military aircraft, to the demanding specifications of the USAF.” Hanbey is referring to the Airbus 330 MRTT, which carries more fuel than the KC-46A Pegasus — 111 tonnes, as against 96 tonnes — but which remains in many respects a civilian airliner that retains commercial-style seating inside for 291 passengers. In contrast, the KC-46A Pegasus has military style “palletised” seating that can be quickly bolted on for up to 160 passengers. In a medical evacuation role, it can carry 54 stretchers with patients, along with on-board emergency oxygen. To permit large cargo loads, the Pegasus has giant side doors, the size of those on the C-17 Globemaster III cargo plane. A key feature of the KC-46A is its tanker-specific avionics, with the twin-pilot cockpit fitted with state-of-the-art displays developed for the 787 Dreamliner. In accordance with USAF demands, the “boom operator”, who operates the attachment that protrudes from the tail of the Pegasus and pumps fuel at 1,200 gallons per minute into the aircraft being refuelled, has a three-dimensional view of the operation from seven cameras that look to the rear. The pilots too view the operation, allowing them to position their tanker aircraft suitably. For now, the Airbus 330 MRTT enjoys a first-mover advantage, having already logged orders from the air forces of Australia (seven tankers), United Kingdom (14) France (nine), Saudi Arabia (seven), The Netherlands (two), Singapore (six), South Korea (four) and UAE (three). But Pratyush Kumar, Boeing’s chief in India argues: “Those orders were placed when the KC-46A hadn’t entered service. Now, it provides India an additional option — one that consumes 30 per cent less fuel, is 20 per cent cheaper to operate, and that is derived from an aircraft with a dispatch reliability rate of 99.7 per cent.”

idrw.org . Read more at India No 1 Defence News Website , Kindly don't paste our work in other websites http://idrw.org/boeing-in-fray-for-indian-air-forces-tanker-contest/ .

November 14, 2016

Balochistan expats term Pakistani army as ‘terrorist army’, demand freedom



Baloch citizens recently staged a massive protest in Bremen to expose Islamabad’s brutalities and state-sponsored terrorism in their province, and dubbed the Pakistani Army as “terrorist army”.
 As the demand for Balochistan’s freedom is gaining momentum both inside and outside Pakistan, exiled Baloch citizens recently staged a massive protest here to expose Islamabad’s brutalities and state-sponsored terrorism in their province, and dubbed the Pakistani Army as “terrorist army”.  Similar protests also took place in Quetta, London and Stockholm on November13 — the day on which the people of Balochistan pay tribute to martyrs of the Baloch freedom struggle every year.
Protesting Baloch expats alleged that tens of thousands of innocent Baloch citizens were mercilessly killed by the Pakistani army in fake encounters and brutal army operations adding that several innocent Baloch civilians have also been killed in terrorist attacks, and the recent attack on Sheikh Noorani Shrine is a latest in series of such killings. World human rights bodies and activists have also repeatedly expressed their concerns over the genocide, and raised alarms over ongoing state-sponsored terrorism in Balochistan, but to no avail as brutalities continue unabated.

Most of the attacks in Balochistan bore sectarian mark and often is handiworks of Punjab-based terror outfits, which are thriving on funding by the Pakistani army and the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI). The protesting Baloch activists squarely blamed the Pakistani army and ISI for the attacks and unrest in their impoverished, neglected and beleaguered province. “Balochistan is Pakistan’s largest and poorest province, where anger against the Pakistan government and the army is growing louder and freedom movement is gaining ground. In a bid to crush the voice of dissent, the Pakistani army is using brute force and hundreds of pro-freedom Baloch activists are being picked up and assaulted by ISI, while some of them were killed, the others are missing yet,” said one of the protesters.
Even as the Pakistan army is indifferent, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s government hardly bothers about the growing rebellion and anger in Balochistan, they said. Citing an example of the Sharif government’s apathy, they said despite stiff resistances by locals against the Gwadar port project, the Pakistani Prime Minister launched the controversial China-Pakistan Economic Corridor in collaboration with China. The work on CPEC is progressing despite protests, they added.

india,com

India conducts a massive military exercise with troops and helicopters on Pakistan border

 
India-Pakistan relations are bedeviled by religion as the basis of Pakistan was the two nation theory which stated that Hindus and Muslims were separate countries and could not live together. The two nation theory collapsed with the creation of Bangladesh after the breakup of Pakistan. Bangladesh was also Muslim, but it thought to be better off away from Pakistan. The state of Pakistan failed to recognize the collapse of the two nation theory and continued a terror war against " Hindu " India. At one time it became an ally of the USA, but now the USA is wary of it.

Military exercise

India and.Pakistan fought a war over Kargil in 1998 and Pakistan suffered a defeat. A ceasefire was brought about by Clinton, but Pakistan could not reconcile to it. It continued its policy of bleeding India with 100 cuts.With rising terror attacks in Kashmir and Indian cities the Indian army and air force have conducted a massive air-army exercise on the Pakistan border in Rajasthan close to the Indian town of Jaisalmer. The military exercise simulated battle conditions as a strike corps of the Indian army with battle tanks and helicopters carried out the exercise. The desert sands give an idea that in the next war India may well thrust into Sind, which is a restive province of Pakistan. The news of the exercise was reported by Times news channel in its prime time TV broadcast.

Pakistan racked by dissension

Pakistan had also carried out a similar exercise a month back, but the country is faced with internal dissension and terror attack by the Sunni outfits ISIS and the Jaish-e-Mohammad.These Sunni outfits want to set up a regime based on the Sharia and routinely commit terror attacks. Yesterday the ISIS attacked a Sufi shrine in Baluchistan revered by Shia Muslims, and 59 were killed.There is also a low-intensity conflict on in Baluchistan against the Pakistan state for independence.

Last word

The US was the ally of Pakistan for five decades but with Pakistan becoming a terror center the relationship has cooled and the Americans for strategic reasons have chosen India as their partner. India and the USA have just finished a joint exercise in Ladakh. The present exercise was to test the response of a combined army- helicopter invasion of Sind with battle tanks striking deep. With Donald Trump becoming President he will soon have to face the situation in SE Asia.

 blastingnews

November 12, 2016

India Set To Acquire 100 Armed Avenger Drones From The US


The Indian Air Force is set to acquire its first missile-armed unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) from the US. The Indian Air Force has for years said it needs armed drones - weapon systems.
In the past, the US has refused to provide armed Predator drones to India, which have been used in both Afghanistan and Pakistan, for fear that New Delhi would turn the weapons against the Pakistanis at a time when Washington sought robust cooperation in the fight against Al Qaeda.
However, with the geopolitical landscape having shifted in recent years towards battling against Daesh in addition to improving relations between Washington and New Delhi in a bid to contain China, the US has signalled a willingness to provide India with lethal unmanned aerial vehicles.
The details of procurement of up to 100 armed Predator C Avengers for the India Air Force will be discussed with the outgoing US Secretary of State Ash Carter during his visit to India this December. If the deal goes through, it will make India the largest operator of this drone in the world after the United States.
Progress in talks has largely been made possible by India joining the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) and being declared a "major defence partner" of the US. India formally applied for membership to MTCR in June of 2015, and with the support of the United States and France, became a member on June 27, 2016.
India may also discuss the purchase of 22 unarmed MQ-9 Predators during Carter's visit. The Indian Navy is looking to acquire more UAVs for its surface fleet. The Navy operates two squadrons of the IAI Heron and the IAI Searcher Mk-II UAVs purchased from Israel and plans to add at least two more squadrons.

Avenger drone includes stealth features such as internal weapons storage and will support weapons used on the MQ-9 Predator, the deadliest drone in the world. The Hellfire anti-tank missiles fired from the Avenger can strike targets eight kilometers distant. The Avenger also has the ability to detect and track targets across the Line of Control (LoC) and attack them while flying well within Indian airspace. It can fly for up to 18 hours to reach targets 2,900 km away.
Defence Minister Manohar Parrikar is expected to point to Paksistan’s inaction against militant groups like Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) and Jaish-e-Muhammad (JeM) that pose a direct threat to the national security of India in order to justify the transfer of drone technology.

 swarajyamag

November 11, 2016

Israel President’s India trip to focus on major defence ties



The Israeli President will hold extensive talks with his Indian counterpart Pranab Mukherjee and Prime Minister Narendra Modi.Further deepening the already close defence ties will be a major focus of Israeli President Reuven Rivlin’s eight-day trip to India beginning Monday during which both sides are also set to ink a number of MoUs to expand cooperation in areas of energy, agriculture and trade. 
 Ahead of Rivlin’s visit here, first by an Israeli President in nearly two decades, the Jewish country’s envoy Daniel Carmon said the bilateral defence ties were beyond buyer-seller and military-to-military relationship and the message will be to broaden it further besides boosting cooperation in some other sectors.

During his stay, the Israeli President will hold extensive talks with his Indian counterpart Pranab Mukherjee and Prime Minister Narendra Modi covering key bilateral and regional issues besides attending a ceremony in Taj Hotel and Chabad House in Mumbai to pay tribute to victims of 26/11 attack in which six Jews were also killed.
On defence cooperation, Carmon said Israel has plans for fresh joint ventures and technology transfer in developing weapons systems and ensuring implementation of Modi’s Make in India initiative in the key sector which is a “major facet” of his country’s “special relationship” with India.
“It is a very deep relationship. India and Israel enjoy very unique relation in areas of defence…. There are plans for fresh joint venture and technology transfer,” he told reporters, refusing to go into specifics.
India is Israel’s largest buyer of military hardware and the latter has been supplying various weapons systems, missiles and unmanned aerial vehicles over the last few years but the transactions have largely remained behind the curtains.
Carmon said Rivlin’s “large” delegation will comprise honchos of top Israeli arms manufacturing companies and senior government officials dealing with matters relating to defence. Asked about Modi’s proposed visit to Israel, he said it will happen and will be a very important trip. It was being decided by the two governments when it will happen, the envoy said.
There were indications that the Prime Minister may visit Tel Aviv in first part of 2017 which will be 25th year of formal diplomatic ties between the two countries. India had established “full” diplomatic relationship with Israel in 1992 though it had recognised the country in 1950.
Asked about the proposed Free Trade Agreement between the two countries, he said its finalisation “should and could be a easier process henceforth”. The envoy said both countries are set to sign a raft of pacts in areas of education, energy, water, agriculture and research and development during Rivlin’s visit.
On Modi comparing India’s cross LoC military action against terror launchpads following Uri attack to Israeli-type response, the envoy said his country had to develop robust capability to protect its citizens, considering the geo-political situation.
He said Israel was ready to share with India its technology and enhance security ties. In October last year, President Mukherjee had visited Israel, the first by an Indian head of state. Rivlin will also visit Chandigarh where he will inaugurate an Agro Tech conference along with Mukherjee. President Rivlin will head business and academic delegations including chancellors of 12 Israeli universities as well as Israeli companies, some of which are already active and successful in India.
He said at least 15 MoUs are likely to be signed between Indian and Israeli educational institutions during the visit. Identifying agriculture and water conservation as key areas of cooperation, he said the number of agri centres set up by Israel in India will go up from current 15 to 40. The visit will focus on strengthening the ever growing economic ties between India and Israel in the fields of agriculture and water, and promoting academic cooperation, he said.
Asked about India attempting to strengthen ties with countries like Iran, UAE and Saudi Arabia, the envoy said Indo-Israel bilateral ties were not affected by New Delhi’s relationship with other nations.
In Agra, the Israeli President will visit Taj Mahal and an Israeli water treatment plant. He will also visit the Indo-Israeli Agricultural Project’s Center of Excellence in Karnal.

 indianexpress